Interesting Early Medieval English Nicknames

In England, last names did not really exist in the early Middle Ages. At least, surnames did not exist in the same capacity as they do today. It was only after the Norman Conquest in 1066 did people start to use last names. 

Because last names were uncommon, people had to use other ways to distinguish them from others in their area that shared their name. For example, the Domesday Book referred to people by the place they lived, their profession, who their parents were, their relation to the king, their title, or a nickname of some kind.

Shepherd returning with a lost sheep while a lady greets him | Ms. Ludwig XV 9 (83.MR.179), fol. 109 | Source: The Getty Museum

When I looked through the Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England to create my lists of early medieval names, I stumbled upon quite a few nicknames. A good portion of early medieval nicknames are quite funny, unusual, or have some sort of story behind them. 

Unfortunately, the origins of many of the nicknames are lost to time. However, if I could not find any concrete information about the person, I researched the nickname. This gave me some context of their potential backstory.  

Because so much has been lost to time, any comments of mine about how each individual earned their nickname is purely speculation. 

Due to the size of the Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England’s database, I will gradually add more names to this list. 

My list includes early medieval nicknames I found interesting, funny, unusual, or hilariously specific. Some are tamer than others, but hopefully, you find this list just as interesting as I do.

Eadmær Ator

Apparently “ator” is Old English for poison or venom. It definitely makes me wonder what Eadmær did to get that nickname!

Almær Ator

Eadric the wild

Clearly Eadric behaved in absurd ways to get this nickname.

Alweald the bald

Siward the fat

Ælfric the small

Wulfric Cave

“Cave” could potentially come from the Latin word “calvus,” meaning bald.

Wulfwig the wild

Godwine Frambolt

“Fram” means “bold, active, strong” in Old English. “Bolt” means “bolt, bar.” Frambolt may indicate that Godwine was very strong or perhaps he made very strong bolts/bars. 

Hereweard the Wake

The Old English word for “wake” means the same thing in modern English. Hereweard was probably known for being a vigilant person or perhaps even an excellent guard. 

Ælfric the black

Alwine Devil

Siward Sot

“Sot” either comes from the Middle English word for a foolish or a dishonest person. In Old English, “sot” means soot. 

Azur Rot

Even in Old English and Middle English “rot” meant “decay/putrefy.” I wonder what Azur did to earn this last name!

Beorhtmær the Englishman

I find it interesting that the people around Beorhtmær wanted to specify that he was English.

Oswine the wild, canon of Dover

Ælfric the whelp

Godwine Fot

“Fot” means foot in Old English. 

Leofnoth Sterre

“Sterre” means star in Middle English.

Eadric Grim

“Grim” in Old English meant “fierce, severe, terrible, savage, cruel, angry.” I couldn’t find any detailed information about Eadric Grim as a person, but based on his last name I don’t think he was a person you wanted to be around!

Albert the Lotharingian

Ælfgar the tall

Almær Holdfæst

Holdfæst appears to be another way to spell “holdfast.” 

Beorhtric the black, free man

Eskil Barn

“Barn” could have several possible meanings. The first comes from the Old Norse word for child. Upper-class men used the name Barn, possibly meaning “a young man of a prominent family.” Or it simply could indicate that Eskil worked or lived near a barn. 

Almær the man of Bondi the staller

Alweard the stumpy

Alwine Frost

“Frost” had the same definition as today. It’s possible Alwine either had a cold personality or simply had white hair, giving him a frosty appearance. 

Alwig the harper

Alfred, the man of Esgar the staller

Alric Bigga

“Bigga” meant large, strong, or stout. It is possible Alric was a very large person. (Or perhaps extremely small depending on his peers’ sense of humor!)

Ealdred Bot

“Bot” in Old English has several meanings, including (but not limited to!) help, rescue, repair, improvement, and penance. Perhaps Ealdred Bot was a very helpful person or a handyman of some kind. 

Ælfgar Thræc

I had some trouble with this one. I believe “thræc” starts with a “þ” (a thorn) in Old English. If I’m correct, that means Ælfgar’s nickname is “þræc,” which means violence, force, or pressure. Probably not a person you want to be around!

Sælgifu the almswoman

I included Sælgifu on this list because she is one of the few women I’ve found so far who is known by their profession. (Besides nuns.) “Almswoman” is an archaic word for a female beggar. 

Alweard Gleawbeorht

Gleawbeorht is made out of the words “gleaw” meaning wise/prudent and “beorht” meaning bright/clear. Perhaps Alweard was known for being wise and a clear speaker?

Godric Wisce

“Wisce” means “a meadow liable to floods.” 

Eadgifu the girl

Eadric Lang

“Lang” meant tall in Old English. Presumably, Eadric was tall. (Or he could have been very short if the people who gave him his name wanted to be funny!) 

Alweard Bellrope

I am going to guess that Alweard was in charge of ringing bells. 

Wulfmær the chubby

Heoruwulf the man of Eadgifu the fair

Eadlufu Thief

My educated guess here is that Eadlufu may have been a thief. 

Eadric Spuda

Oslac the white

Ælfric the pig

I am going to make another educated guess and say that Ælfric was not a literal pig. I wonder what he did to earn that name!

Esbern Croc

“Croc” means “pot” in Old English.

Wulfwine the meadmaker

Ælfhild the abbot’s mother

Tovi the man of Ælfric son of Goding

Godric ‘Fifteen Acres’

I’m guessing Godric either owned fifteen acres or he was involved in an incident regarding fifteen acres. 

Alwine the white

Thorkil the steersman

Godwine Wombstring

It seems like there may have been some type of incident with Godwine’s umbilical cord. 

Alwine Bucstan

Depending on whether or not “buc” is spelled with a “ú” (and the PASE doesn’t specify), “buc” could mean either buck like a deer, belly, or a pitcher of some sort. “Stan” means stone. So Bucstan could mean buck stone, belly stone, or pitcher stone. 

Godwine Haldein

“Haldein” means half Dane. 

Leomær the beadle

Thorsten the red

Ælfgar Cida

“Cida” possibly comes from the Old English word “cídan” which means complain or blame. If this is right, then I have a feeling Ælfgar may have been known as a whiner. 

Edwin Grut

“Grut” is Old English for “groats, course meal” and comes from Old Norse for “porridge.” Perhaps Edwin made a very good porridge or there was some embarrassing incident he was part of that involved porridge. 

Wulfric the wild

Sources:

Bosworth, Joseph. “LANG.” An Anglo-Saxon Dictionary Online, edited by Thomas Northcote Toller et al., Faculty of Arts, Charles University, 2014, https://bosworthtoller.com/21145

Bosworth, Joseph. “croc.” An Anglo-Saxon Dictionary Online, edited by Thomas Northcote Toller et al., Faculty of Arts, Charles University, 2014, https://bosworthtoller.com/42165

Bosworth, Joseph. “BÚC.” An Anglo-Saxon Dictionary Online, edited by Thomas Northcote Toller et al., Faculty of Arts, Charles University, 2014, https://bosworthtoller.com/5364

Bosworth, Joseph. “buc.” An Anglo-Saxon Dictionary Online, edited by Thomas Northcote Toller et al., Faculty of Arts, Charles University, 2014, https://bosworthtoller.com/41078

Bosworth, Joseph. “stán.” An Anglo-Saxon Dictionary Online, edited by Thomas Northcote Toller et al., Faculty of Arts, Charles University, 2014, https://bosworthtoller.com/28714

Bosworth, Joseph. “CÍDAN.” An Anglo-Saxon Dictionary Online, edited by Thomas Northcote Toller et al., Faculty of Arts, Charles University, 2014, https://bosworthtoller.com/6118

‘Domesday’, Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England, http://www.pase.ac.uk.

Reaney, Percy H., and Richard Middlewood Wilson. A Dictionary of English Surnames. Routledge, 1991. 

https://www.historic-uk.com/CultureUK/Surnames/

https://old-engli.sh/dictionary.php

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/almswoman

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/ator

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/beorht

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/bot#Old_English

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/fot#Middle_English

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/gleaw

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/rot#English

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/sot

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/sterre

Early Medieval Male Names From England’s Domesday Book

If you are a fiction writer, you probably spend a good amount of time researching names for your characters. This is especially true if you write historical fiction. It is important to find historically accurate names. I write fiction that takes place in early medieval England, so I am always searching for early medieval names. 

It can be difficult to find early medieval names that are historically accurate. I have started to compile a list of male names from primary sources. By using primary sources, I can be sure that these names were actually used by early medieval men. If you are looking for early medieval female names, I’ve already posted a list here.

There are thousands of early medieval male names out there so this list is not exhaustive. I plan to add to it over time. Hopefully, this list will help you find the perfect name for your character!

An illumination from a medieval manuscript of a blonde man in an orange and green tunic and golden yellow hose bending over with a ball in his hand.
A man bending over with something in his hand | Add MS 62925 f.30r | Source: The British Library

Note: To ensure that the names are as historically accurate as possible, I intend to document them as they were originally spelled to the best of my ability. Some names may include letters that are no longer in the English language such as “æ.”

Male Names

Azur

Ælfgar

Ælfstan

Ælfwig

Ælfwine

Æthelmær

Æthelnoth

Æthelric

Æthelsige

Æthelwig

Baldwin

Beorhtric

Beorhtsige 

Bondi 

Carl

Eadmær

Eadric

Ealdred 

Ecgfrith

Edward

Edwin

Esgar 

Giso

Godwine

Harold

Herman

Leofric

Leofnoth

Leofwine

Mærleswein

Morcar

Ordric

RalphRobert

Siward

Stigand

Toki

Tosti

Ulf

Walter

Waltheof 

William

Wihtgar

Wulfric

Wulfstan

Wulfweald

Wulfweard

Wulfwig

Wulfwine

Source:

‘Domesday’, Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England, https://domesday.pase.ac.uk, accessed 22 June 2021 and 25 June 2021.

Early Medieval Female Names

I am currently in the process of writing a novel about a young boy growing up in an early 10th century English monastery. As a result, I’m constantly looking for early medieval names. To help other writers, I am compiling a list of names I’ve found so far. For this post in particular I am listing female names/names associated with women. I will make a separate post for male names later. (I am separating the two because there are not as many female names in primary sources.)

Hopefully this will help you find the perfect name for your character!

An illumination from a medieval manuscript of an alarmed woman with blonde hair in a floor length dark blue dress holding a decoration.
An alarmed woman holding a decoration | Add MS 62925 f.46r | Source: The British Library

Note: This list will be added to as time goes by, as it is most certainly NOT an exhaustive list! Also I intend to spell the names as they were written down originally to the best of my ability, so I will use letters that are no longer used in modern English such as “æ.”

Female Names

Alflæd 

Althryth

Alwynn 

Anna

Ælfgifu

Ælfgyth

Ælfhild

Ælfrun

Ælfthryth

Æthelgifu

Æthelgyth

Beorhtflæd

Beorhtgifu 

Dufe

Eadgifu

Eadgyth

Ealdgifu

Ealdgyth

Goda

Gode

Godeza

Godgifu

Godgyth

Gunnhild

Gytha

Hungifu

Leofflæd

Leofgifu

Leofrun

Leofwaru 

Mahthild 

Mærwynn

Mereswith

Modgifu

Sægyth

Sælgifu

Thorild

Wigflæd 

Wulfflæd

Wulfgifu

Wulfrun

Wulfwynn

Source:

‘Domesday’, Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England, https://domesday.pase.ac.uk, accessed 22 June 2021 and 25 June 2021.